Are you allowed to buy ‘throwaway’ plane tickets to avoid high fares?

Lufthansa is cracking down on the practice of travellers using “throwaway” tickets to circumvent high fares. The German national airline is suing a passenger for the difference between the fare paid and the amount due for the journey actually made. The case sheds light on this and other forms of “tariff abuse” by passengers – and the risks that travellers take.  For exclusive articles, events and an advertising-free read for just
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a month A passenger bought a business-class return ticket from Oslo via Frankfurt to Seattle for around £600. He flew Oslo-Frankfurt-Seattle-Frankfurt but failed to board the final leg back to the Norwegian capital. Lufthansa calculated that he should have paid around four times as much for the itinerary he actually flew. The airline is not relentlessly pursuing an individual passenger, but rather seeking to establish in law what is a long-established contract term and to dissuade other travellers from using the same trick.  At the heart of the issue is the fact that the fare from A to B is often higher than the fare A to B to C. So in a test booking I made, Air France would sell me a ticket from Moscow to Paris to Heathrow for only £72, but were I going only from Moscow to Paris then the fare was three times higher. Read more here >>>

thumbnail courtesy of independent.co.uk

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