‘Ice tsunami’ hits New York prompting evacuations

As parts of the UK hit record high temperatures for February, an “ice tsunami” has been ravaging the US. The phenomenon, officially called an ice shove or ice surge, occurs when ocean currents, strong winds or temperature differences push ice blocks from the water onto the shore – in this case winds of 119kph. Towering 30ft walls of ice were spotted on the shores of Lake Erie and banks of the Niagara River in New York State near the Canadian border on Monday 25 February. For exclusive articles, events and an advertising-free read for just
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a month Video footage shows undulating chunks of ice surging over the lake’s edge, eerily propelled by an invisible force. Police warned people to drive carefully, while a voluntary evacuation was encouraged for residents of Hoover Beach, a neighbourhood on the eastern edge of Lake Erie.   “We’ve had storms in the past but nothing like this,” Hoover Beach local Dave Schultz told WGRZ, adding that in 50 years he’s never seen the ice pushed up against the walls and spilling onto residents’ patios like it is at the moment. Read more here >>>

thumbnail courtesy of independent.co.uk

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